Aberteifi & Fish

  • Posted by howies
  • 1 December 2008

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Aberteifi & Fish

Aberteifi & Fish
The river Teifi is 75.8 miles long and is one of the largest rivers in Wales. It is also one of the most pristine and least modified river catchments in lowland Britain.

Cardigan (Aberteifi in Welsh) used to be a thriving port for trading as well as ship building. But the development and activity of the slate quarry caused a build up of waste material in the river, making the river shallower in places, which in turn prevented access by larger boats. This was seen to be the cause of the end of the sea trading port.

The Teifi is renowned as one of the best rivers in Wales for salmon fishing. However, fish stocks have been under steady threat since the 1960s. This was due to the use of drift nets by Irish Sea trawlers. In 2006 drift nets were banned and since then salmon numbers in the Teifi have been on the rise.

Mostly sewin, salmon, brown trout and bass are found in the Teifi. A reasonable year’s run will contain around 20,000 fish. The average Teifi salmon weighs around 9lb, but they have been recorded up to as big as 30lb.

The Teifi is famous for its rich history of coracle net fishing. This used to be the only real source of income for many of the town’s folk. Now in Cardigan there is only one fishmonger and one lobster/crab seller.

Fishmongers have closed and been replaced by large supermarket chains. One man and his boat are fighting back, his name is Len, and you’ll see him come rain or shine out on the bay catching lobsters and crabs (and sometimes a cold). When he has something to sell you will see a sign outside his door (but only when he has caught something).