hencatraz

  • Posted by ade
  • 1 April 2009

come fox

Last night at 11.37pm under spotlights I finally made and fitted the door to the chicken run. They are now safe from the ginger chicken taster.

There is definitely an art to getting the wire tight and straight, that I have learnt now that I have finished. Always the way with DIY projects

Now we wait for eggs.

Come on girls. And breathe, and push.

Spring is in. Soup is out.

  • Posted by ruben
  • 21 March 2009

Interesting information from Google.

Here's a graph showing how UK search volumes for soup follow clearly defined seasonal trends.

picture-1

 

Check here for more info on regional soup popularity and flavour trends.

Butternut Squash is on a roll.

picture-2

Any other (geeky) seasonal observations, anyone?

I want to tell you why I think The Do Lectures are important.

And I want to tell you how over the next decade they will become one of the most important set of talks in the world. And yet there’s little evidence to suggest that’s possible right now.

To that end I want to tell you about a book that I have never read.

And the two things it taught me.

(Bare with me, the dots will connect.)

The book was called What Make’s Sammy Run.

It’s about the drive of someone who started at the bottom.

And how he worked his way up to the top.

And although a fictional character, I always wondered what drove him.

What made him run? Something had set him off. But what exactly? This ‘Something’ had always interested me.

Just by being told the story of the book had inspired me without ever reading it. But the idea that you could start at the bottom and work your way up just through hard-work, never left me.

This was my first learning. I had discovered the power of story telling. And how people’s stories can release the handbrake in our minds.

This was the reason Clare and myself started The Do lectures. To bring these remarkable storytellers together in one place to inspire the rest of us. To release lots of handbrakes.

But going back to the book for a minute, I don’t think he was about just hard-work and persistence. I think there was a little more to it.

My take on it is this, I don’t think he ever dreamt of just being a runner. I believe as he ran, he took his dream of running the whole thing along with him.

Indeed it was this dream that made him run. And this brings me to my second piece of learning from the book that I never read: The power of dreams.

What makes some people change things? What makes some people start something when the odds are so stacked against them? What keeps them going when others fall by the wayside? Well, my answer is because these people are dreamers. They have made it exist in their own head long before it exists in real life.

They use their vision of things to take them forward. Just like cats eyes in the road, their dream slowly guides them along the way.

And right now that is where we are at with The Do Lectures. We got the dream in our heads. And we are running.

We are going to create a set of talks over the next decade that will change things, create national debate on issues that are important to all of us from the environment to business to technology to design to education to food to play.

It will become an amazing resource for the Doers of the world both in terms of inspiration and, just as importantly, the plain nuts and bolts practical stuff of how to do this or that.

The first Do Lectures felt like being at the start of something. Like being at the first Glastonbury. But a Glastonbury for talks rather than music.

And now before this September’s talks start, the website should have received over 100,000 visits from over 3000 cities in over 100 countries. It’s still small in comparison to some. But all great things start out small.

So right now we are busy trying to find a sponsor and trying to raise donations too. We are doing that thing of jumping off the edge of the cliff and building our wings on the way down. But that’s what Doers do.

They tell stories. They dream a lot. But at the end of the day, they make things happen.

If you would like to make a small Do-nation, please Do.

Help us run.

David Hieatt

Co-founder of the Do lectures.

www.thedolectures.co.uk

Do has grown up

  • Posted by howies
  • 5 March 2009

the Do lectures is taking its first steps into adulthood.

it has a bank account.

its a ltd company.

it's purpose is to build a world class resource for doers to make a positive change.

it has to pay its way in the world but it is not here for profit.

it's here to make people think, to inspire us to go do good things.

It has its own blog so if you want to know what is happening, go visit.

you can donate on the website to help make this years talks happen. (every pound helps)

it's a moment, as they say.

and we got some amazing speakers lined up.

the speakers will be announced on May 1st. 

the 40 tickets that are going to be sold, will go on sale May 1st.

The 40 tickets that will be given to students will be awarded to those who write the best letters to the do lectures and tell us what they want to do.

So all good stuff.

But it does need your donations to keep on Do-ing, so if you can, please Do.

www.thedolectures.co.uk  twitter.com/dolectures

Tea manifesto

  • Posted by howies
  • 9 January 2009

i am a tea junkie.

right now i am doing my normal january thing - no choc, no coffee, no alcohol and no tea.

i miss the no tea the most.

i made everyone a cuppa tea this morning, including myself out of habit.

then had to watch it go cold as i remembered it was january.

anyway, i saw this the morning.

http://teaappreciationsociety.blogspot.com/

we even get a mention.

pete, if you are reading this, lets ask them to do a piece for the catalogue.

pete, if you are not reading this, where are ya?

 
OUR MANIFESTO
Manifesto of the Tea Appreciation Society 

1. We want to sing the love of tea.

2. The essential elements of our poetry will be loose leaf tea, boiled water, a tea pot, a china cup and a biscuit.

3. Literature has up to now magnified idleness, and slumber. We want to exalt these slow movements of ecstasy, feverish boiling of the kettle, the pour, the perilous stir, the rattle and the clink of the spoon.

4. We declare that the splendour of the world has been enriched by an old beauty: the beauty of tea.

5. Beauty exists only in considered brewing. There is no masterpiece that has an aggressive character. Poetry is not a violent assault on the forces of infusion.

6. We want to glorify peace - the only cure for the world - militarism, patriotism; these destructive gestures kill the beautiful ideas of the human race.

7. We want to visit museums and libraries, encourage philosophy.

8. We will sing of the great crowds agitated by work; the revolt, smashing the supermarkets; we will rejoice in the baking of bread; the polyphonic surf of revolutions in modern music as we play our ukuleles: the nocturnal vibration of the worms in our compost; our spirits suspended from the clouds by the thread of cup in sleeve tea bags; and the gliding flight of creativity whose propeller sounds like the sipping of enthusiastic tea drinkers.

chicken sitting

  • Posted by howies
  • 6 January 2009

Categories:

we are babysitting some chickens for james at fforest till the spring. (17 of them)

they are as funny as hell.

this cockeral walks like John Cleese when he was in faulty towers.

we get half a dozen eggs a day.

more when its warmer.

Do update

  • Posted by howies
  • 26 November 2008

The Do lectures has had 45,419 visits from people in 129 countries.

It has had visitors from 3,414 cities.

It is currently number 23 (magic number) in the video podcast charts on apple iTunes. it has been up to number 3. Please subscribe today: click here. (Or go to iTunes, search 'the do lectures')

So now we start the job of finding a sponsor.

And making a list of who we invite to talk next year.

Got any ideas.

Here's a couple from me: Prince Charles. Malcolm Gladwell.

 

Tom Doing the dishes at the Do

Tom Doing the dishes at the Do

mmm

  • Posted by howies
  • 18 November 2008

Categories:

The lovely people at Jordans have very kindly sent us a boxful of their delicious cereal.

There's loads of great flavours:

Fruity Fibre, Nut & Seed, Fruit & Nut, Tropical, Super Berry and good ol' Natural

They've been in business since 1855! That's 153 years in the cereal world - no wonder their muesli is the yummiest and the best out there.

So a big thanks to everyone over at Jordans cereals - we'll be sure to enjoy!

Prince Charles

  • Posted by howies
  • 14 November 2008

He his sixty today.

And from where I sit, he talks more sense than most on the environment.

Will he be speaking at the Do lectures on how dumb GM food is?

Well, all we can do is ask him if he would.

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