the howies headquarters

Farmer Friendly Jeans

  • Posted by alex
  • 6 September 2013
This denim is completely new for howies this season. But as you know, to push things forward in life, you’ve always got to keep moving...

This is our new hemp selvedge jean, The Hobo.

Hemp is renowned for being one of the most environmentally friendly and versatile crops around. It also makes a mean pair of jeans.

That's because hemp crops are sustainable and require no irrigation. So a jean like the Hobo, made from 40% hemp and 60% cotton, can save up to 2,400 litres of water when compared to a regular 100% cotton jean. That’s enough to give one person clean drinking water for two years. Gulp. In addition, hemp uses no pesticides or herbicides to grow as it is naturally antibacterial, which is great for you, the farmer and the field.

They’ve got a look we love too. The tiny white flecks of hemp fibre within the denim help give them a unique 'slubby' appearance. And adding to their natural feel, our Hobo jean has been coloured using indigo dye, which will give you a bit of the old ‘blue hands’ at first, but will age beautifully to give you a jean unlike anyone else’s.

This denim is completely new for howies this season. But as you know, to push things forward in life, you’ve always got to keep moving...

Just like a hobo.

Shop Men's Hobo Hemp Selvedge Jeans >



howies Mens Hemp Selvedge Jeans

howies Mens Hemp Selvedge Jeans

howies Hemp Selvedge Denim Jeans

CLUNK-PING-PLUNK-CLANG

  • Posted by alex
  • 18 April 2013
It might be a slow, messy affair... but all that hard work is worth it in the end. It’s what gives a howies tee its soul.

One thing you can be sure of when you buy one of our printed organic cotton t-shirts, is that it was screenprinted by hand in our own little printshop, right here in Cardigan.

There’s no modern, automated print process here. And we don’t just push a button on a machine to print our t-shirts. Mass-production, it ain’t.

In fact, it’s safe to say, that just about the only thing that is automated in our printshop is the kettle.

Instead, we use an old-fashioned carousel, silk mesh screens and a bit of elbow grease. Tidy Mike prints each and everyone of them by hand, with the same level of skill, craftmanship and respect for the end product that they deserve.

It might be a slow, messy affair... but all that hard work is worth it in the end. It’s what gives a howies tee its soul.

Now, someone make Mike a cuppa.

New men's organic cotton T-shirts >
New women's organic cotton T-shirts >

Printshop howies silk screen

Printshop howies 8mm

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Printshop howies Yellow ink

Printshop howies big bird

Printshop howies #teamhowies posi

Printshop howies cowboys silkscreen

Printshop howies UHT screen

Printshop howies Tattoos

Printshop howies dryer sign

MMXXII Missile

  • Posted by alex
  • 27 July 2012

The Sideburns of Glory t-shirt was a big hit. Poor Mike has been keeping the printshop lights burning long into the night trying to catch up.

It's all been for a good cause though, with £5 from every tee going to the Dave Rayner fund (more on that here).

This weekend it's The Marquis of Cavendish's turn to put us all on the edge of our seats as he faces 9 trips to the top of Box Hill before the final dash for the line in the Olympic road race.

We'd already drawn this up and thought it'd be nice to share it for the weekend. We weren't planning to put this design on a t-shirt but if you tweet @howies with #MMXIImissile or like the design on Facebook over the weekend, we might ask Mike to print a few.

This weekend I run the longest race I have ever entered.

The Endurancelife   #UTSW  100 miles clockwise round the Cornish coastal path from Porthleven to Watergate Bay in a 40 hour time limit.

I have run some tough Ultra marathons over the years. 125km over the Rockies in Canada at altitude was a challenge. A 1/2 Marathon in snowshoes at -42degrees where my eyeballs froze was also a test.

In preparation I have been running an Ultra of between 35 to 60 miles every month this year, but tomorrow will be the furthest I have tried to run and possibly the hardest I have tried to push myself.

Can I do it? I honestly don't know. I'd like to think that I have learnt to ignore the nagging inner voice that encourages you to quit, but I guess I won't know until I cross the finish line. The weather is going to be bad all weekend, but I like it like that.

There is a saying in ultra running.

"You live an entire lifetime in the course of a single race, all the joy, pain tedium and wonder etched into a single day. Step by step, mile by mile, we keep running through the darkness until we eventually come out the other side at dawn"

It's been quite a journey to get me to this point, and however the weekend goes, I know it will just be the start of the next journey.

I will try to get some pictures onto the howies instagram (@howiesclothing)

A-to-B. Via C.

  • Posted by alex
  • 20 June 2012

Routine can be a good thing, but I recently realised I've been stuck in the grind of A-to-B: Ride to work. Work. Ride home.

The routine has been broken a little in preparation for racing in Italy. So A-to-B has had a little B-to-B loop added at lunch, but last night reminded me it's a lot more fun when A-to-B goes via C. Especially when you don't know where C might be.

I live about 1 mile from work and it took nearly 2 hours to get home via a 30 mile detour on roads I've never seen, over hills I've never climbed and getting lost at a crossroads I couldn't get back to with a map, let alone without one.

Finding myself a little lost, faced with uphill one way and downhill the other, the temptation was to take the easy way out and roll down. But with the setting sun as my only bearing, onward and upward west was the order of the evening and eventually, all would be alright. At the summit, the Preseli's came into view in the distance with familiar-looking fields lining the river valley. It was clear I was heading back to B.

Today is the longest day. 16h 38m 20s of daylight (give or take). That's plenty of time to take the long way home.

Ever wondered where A-to-B might take you if you go via C?

Torch run

  • Posted by aron
  • 25 May 2012

The Olympic torch will be making its way through our little town this Sunday.

So we did a new shop window display to help the runner along.

Follow Your Front Wheel.

  • Posted by hollie
  • 8 March 2012

Tomorrow is my last day at howies.

I joined howies after moving back home fresh from graduating from university in Cardiff, with the plan to ‘work for a little bit, to earn enough money to move back to the city’ ….. that was almost four years ago.

This weekend marks a big change with a permanent move to the dazzling lights of Bristol – so not too far away, but far enough away to feel a bit of a culture shock, that may sound strange to most people as it’s hardly New York, but when you’ve lived in a tiny little town with the same faces for most of your life it is. I’m not a town mouse by any standard.

The fact buses still run services past 6pm in some places still outstands me.

I’m leaving Cardigan on a reflective note, growing up in a small town you have a sense of “I can’t WAIT to move away to some civilisation!” - or even the fact that the nearest McDonalds was over an hour away always seemed so unfair - kids eh!

But now, whether it’s just a sign of growing older, or the fact that since graduating I’ve developed a passion for photography so appreciate the area’s beauty a little more, I look back on growing up here and remember the long summer holidays at the beach and everything else in between that makes me realise this place isn’t quite so bad after all.

I have quite a lot to thank howies for, as a student my main focus for buying anything tended to be money orientated - rather than where it was from and how it came to be, but working here has taught me the importance of provenance- whether it be food, clothing, fabrics, whatever – I’d like to think I’m a bit more clued up on how the world works so can make better consumer decisions as a result. Also I’ve been lucky enough to help out on the past few photoshoots which has been an amazing experience, working with talented buggers like James Bowden and Paul Calver , then seeing some of my work on the shiny new website, which felt like a pretty sweet moment, so thank you for that.

Of course the other main reason to thank howies is also the reason why I’m leaving howies – When the Bristol shop opened a couple of years ago, they employed a young man named Will.

The rest, as they say, is Gavin & Stacy-esque history.

So thanks howies – thanks to the office, to Lou & Hazel for sticking pins in me and drawing on me with biro to alter clothes for production, To Tomos for sharing my love of Karl Pilkington podcasts, to nathan and julia for double checking my sums, To Ruben & Alex for ANYTHING system, camera or computer related (and believe me there were a lot of questions) the caffitiere for making mornings and late night overtime shifts go a little easier, PG for lacing important emails with humour, to the warehouse for putting up with the all parcels I’ve flung at them, to Tidy for Bristol pep talks and massive laughs on staff outings, to the creative boys – Pete for his HILARIOUS on going joke & Aron for mutual family guy love and laughs, Ade for giving me the push I needed, and finally of course thanks to Emma & James, you guys are basically just donuts.

hollie x

 

Anyone who knows me may be glad to hear this, but I am about to embark on a plan to quit smoking cigarettes. Forever. I have to do it to be in with a chance of winning that £500 in our little 10K run bet, or to ever be able to run further than to my local Londis (you can read more about the bet here).

Tut tut, I'm sure a lot of you dissapproving sporty-types will be quoffing into your mungbean salad about now. Well save it. Yes, smoking is stupid, trust me I know. I'm a smoker. My comedy lung capacity and the mahogany hue of my fingernails says so. But I'm not writing this for you (haven't you got some workout stats to go analyse, or something?) Not many of you howies fans do smoke, anyway. So I'm writing this for anyone that does, in the hope that it could nudge just one of them to get off their arse and do something, one day, soon.

We know smoking is disgusting, we know it's wrecking our health and we're all fully aware that if we carry on, it will probably be the death of us. But when you're addicted to nicotine, you go into ostrich-mode at the fear of never being able to smoke again – convincing yourself that you aren't slowly dieing on the inside and that your hacking cough is just a tiny tickley cough, caused by the ickle Marlboro pixies ballet dancing on your windpipe.

So, I've read the books and I've listened to the tapes and they can all be summed up in 100 words, rather than 100,000 – smoking is brainwashing. Remember your first cigarette and how utterly foul it tasted? Well, every single cigarette you ever smoked after that is exactly the same. They are clones, all made the same way, on a production line, using the same cocktail of rubbish and they all taste pretty much the same and are equally disgusting, should you happen to light them on fire. The pleasure you think you get from puffing on them and how you think you now enjoy the taste, is just your brain tricking you. It needs the nicotine that's in them and it will do all manner of Derren Brown-ery on your senses to get it. That includes habitually fooling you into thinking you like the taste of hot burning chemicals and that yellow teeth look cool. Knowing this, gives you an advantage over the bastard.

But you need some sort of emotional trigger, a wake-up call to pull your head out of the sand and realise that this drug owns you and you need to do something about it. My trigger was the bet and how my running has progressed so pathetically. It is also the fear of having to cough up £500 and possibly a lung in the process. You just need to find your trigger.

If you're like me, then it's probably fear stopping you from doing something. All I'll say is give it a go. Connect your brain back to your body, go for a long walk or something and just feel how unfit you are (probably). That alone could be your trigger to make some changes. Maybe then we could all be happy, healthy, lycra clad endorphine junkies, nodding at eachother across the park.

Or don't bother. Maybe you like smoking? Who am I to preach? My goodness, I've become one of those worthy plebs I dislike so much... Carry on.

Prof. Peter Davies

Rest Less

  • Posted by alex
  • 7 March 2012

At the end of March the clocks go forward to mark the start of British Summer Time – losing us one hour in bed, but gaining us extra daylight to do more of the things we love.

So on the night of the 24th, a group from howies will be joined by writer and cyclist Rob Penn and friends for a night-long bike ride across Wales, from beach to border.

The 115 mile race against the sun begins in the early evening in Cardigan. Riding east through the night on dark back roads, over rolling hills and alongside lakes, the route will take us over some of the country's most infamous peaks, before descending into Rob's hometown of Abergavenny, in time for the sunrise.

Some of us will be fast, some of us will be slow, some of us may not even make it to the finish. There will be flat tyres and deflated souls, mud, blood, sweat and struggle – the stuff that makes strong hearts and legs.

But whatever happens, there'll be no time to rest.

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