Tag Archives: food

A Microadventure on the Tube

  • Posted by alex
  • 13 June 2013
Adventure needn't be big, expensive or complicated. Adventure can be found right on your doorstep. In fact it's really easy and it's really fun.

A couple of weeks ago, our old friend Al came down to see us and take us out on some Microadventures. We headed out and spent 2 nights kipping in bivvy bags out in the wild. And now we want you to get out there too.

Adventure needn't be big, expensive, far away or complicated.

You could leave work, head to your local tyre shop, inflate a tractor inner tube and float down the river to cook dinner and sleep on the beach.

You don't need lots of kit either. You can use a survival bag instead of a bivvy, or use blankets if you don't have a sleeping bag. You could even eat a pub on the way so that you don't need a stove or cooking utensils.

Join In With The Summer Of Microadventure

On the night of June 21st (or around then if you can't make it) grab a friend, a colleague, or go on your own. Head for the countryside by bike, on foot, by train, canoe or however you like. Sleep out under the stars and have fun.

Whilst on your microadventure (or when you arrive home), post a photo or video of your adventure on the Microadventures Facebook page, or use the hashtag #microadventure on Twitter, Instagram or Vine.

The top 3 microadventures will win prizes too.

It's as simple as that.

A howies Microadventure on the tube - inflating tubes

A howies Microadventure on the tube - floating downstream

A howies Microadventure on the tube - arrived safe

A howies Microadventure on the tube - time to cook

A howies Microadventure on the tube - fire

A howies Microadventure on the tube - home for the night

Here are some inspirational Microadventure videos from some of you too, from last time we asked to you head out on a Microadventure.

Cook outside

  • Posted by ade
  • 31 May 2013

The sun won't hide forever.

The weather people think it's going to be out this weekend. The trails will be dusty. The ice cream vans will be out. Tarmac will be tacky. The beaches still empty. The blue bells are still out. The lawn will be dry. You can wear your favorite tee.

So cook outside this weekend.

Ruben cooked us an incredible stew over a fire that warmed us after a cold float down the river.

Start a small fire.
Get a big pot.
Put in splash of olive oil.
Chop an onion and garlic and throw them in.
Then add some carrots, a squash, a couple of sweet potatoes, one aubergine, as many red peppers as you want, a spoon of paprika and some chopped tomatoes of your choice. Once it looks like it needs a drink then add vegetable stock and 1/2 a bottle of red wine.

Then drink the rest by the fire and let the whole thing reduce.

When the veg is nearly ready, drop in a cup of cous cous and simmer for 15 minutes. If it needs more liquid, open the second bottle of red.

Eat with a hunk of bread warmed by the fire, and a great view.

beach_cook

Carbon Cycle

  • Posted by ruben
  • 7 March 2013

The carbon impact of cycling is dead interesting. Here’s some food for thought.

There’s a lot of nonsense talked about carbon footprinting. I have a friend who believed that owning and feeding a dog was more carbon intensive than owning and fueling a 4x4.

The truth is that depending on where you draw the boundaries you can prove anything with carbon footprinting. So if your 4x4 is super efficient and only drives 6,000 miles a year and if your dog eats loads of meat that has been reared just for it (i.e. not a by-product of other part of the meat industry and not mixed with vegetable/rice feed) then yes you can show that the 4x4 has a bigger footprint.

So I wasn’t that surprised to see that US Republican Ed Orcutt declare that the CO2 emissions from riding a bike are greater than that of driving a car. Clearly Mr Orcutt is deluded. Particularly as he cites the greater expiration of the cyclists as being the cause. We can ignore Mr Orcutt on the grounds of stupidity but the carbon impact of cycling is dead interesting. Here’s some food for thought.

Mike Berners-Lee in “How bad are bananas?” looks at the impact of cycling a mile. Now the interesting thing is that it depends on what you’ve eaten. This is the fuel for the bike. So if you are fueled by cheeseburgers the impact of cycling a mile is 260g of CO2e but if you are fueled by bananas this falls to 60g. These figures take into account the embodied impact of the bike per mile.

The embodied impact of a family car kept for 200,000 miles is 100g per mile plus the impact of burning a mile’s worth of fuel (between 150g and 200g per mile). But this doesn’t take into account the fact that the car driver will also have eaten food but that the calories from this food are not burnt off but accumulated. This in turn has a knock-on potential impact of running a health service to deal with those non-cyclists who become obese (note: not all non-cyclists become obese).

So the impact of driving a mile in a car is the impact of the fuel use, the embodied impact of the car and the impact of the food eaten by the driver. So if the driver eats cheeseburgers this gives a figure twice as large as that of a cheese burger eating cyclist.

Phew, that’s complex. The key thing is to understand is where the boundaries of your study are. My advice to Mr Orcutt is to get his facts straight, trust the science and ride a bike more.

Words and facts by Mark Shayler at tickety boo

Rest Less Recipe

  • Posted by alex
  • 4 May 2012

There's nothing quite like real food to keep you going when out doing something challenging. Especially at 3am, when your stomach's raw and another energy bar, shot, gel or gram of raw sugar could not be further from your mind.

That's why we asked Laura to make us a few things for the Rest Less ride. Nothing beats home made food to keep you fueled for adventure.

Packed full of Brazil nuts, Almonds and oats for natural energy,
this flap jack got tired bodies and minds across the country.

Chunky Chocolate Nut Flapjacks

200g Oats
30g Desiccated coconut
160g Butter
50g Light muscovado sugar
4 tbsp Golden syrup
100g Brazil nuts, cut into large chunks
50g Almonds, cut into large chunks
85g Good quality dark chocolate, cut into large chunks

* Grease and line tin.
* Mix together oats and coconut.
* Melt butter, sugar and golden syrup in a pan, until sugar has dissolved.
* Stir mixture in with the oats and coconut.
* Spoon into tin and press down evenly.
* Scatter over the nuts and chocolate pieces.
* Bake at 180°C / Gas 4, for 25 - 30 minutes until golden brown.

Unlike your usual energy food, we don't have a list of calories, grams of protein, carbs or how many GI's - but on a scale of edible to delicious, we'd say it's excellent.

Recipe: Laura Elsaesser

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