Ventile
The old craftsmen used to say if you make something well, you make it once. That kind of thinking strikes a chord with us. After all, the best thing we can do for the environment is to make something last longer. That’s why we use this fabric called Ventile.
Ventile was developed over 50 years ago and was used to scale Mount Everest for the very first ascent. No one can else can say that.
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This extraordinary natural fabric is grown from the top 2% of the world’s finest cotton crops.
Its unique tight weave makes it stronger than steel and explains why it is such a natural weatherproof and windproof material. Indeed, it takes 24,000 different strands of cotton and 16 hours just to set up the machine to create Ventile fabric.
But that tight weave is the reason it works so well and lasts so long. Over time the appearance of Ventile will change just like a pair of jeans. The sun will bleach it, the wind will soften it, and washing will fade it. We think it gets better with age.
If you look after Ventile, this fabric should last a decade or two.
What we make using Ventile Cotton:
Ventile Cotton Jackets; Men’s | Women’s


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The map above shows how all the pieces come together to make our Merino wool base layers.

Ventile

The old craftsmen used to say if you make something well, you make it once. That kind of thinking strikes a chord with us. After all, the best thing we can do for the environment is to make something last longer. That’s why we use this fabric called Ventile.

Ventile was developed over 50 years ago and was used to scale Mount Everest for the very first ascent. No one can else can say that.

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Merino Wool
This is the Merino sheep. His wool makes just about the best active clothing you can buy. Way, way more effective than man-made synthetics like polyester. Which is why everyone at howies swears by wearing Merino during sport.
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The Merinos live high up in the New Zealand Alps, where the climate fluctuates from an icy cold -20˚c during the winter months, to a searingly hot 35˚c in the summer. And because of these extremes in climate, the Merino has evolved a remarkable wool, capable of regulating his body temperature in and keeping him alive all seasons.
That means in the summer his wool breathes like crazy, transporting heat and moisture away from his skin, keeping him cool and comfortable. Yet, in the winter, that same wool traps a pocket of air around his body, insulating him from the cold. It’s a perfect example of brilliant design by nature.
And that clever wool will do the same for your body when you wear it too, managing your temperature during changing conditions. When you are cold it will keep you warm. Then, as you warm up, its quick-wicking properties kick in, drawing perspiration away from your skin and out into the atmosphere, meaning you’ll never overheat.
On top of that, there’s virtually no stink, no itch, no creasing, it’s easily washable, it’s sustainable, biodegradable and 100% natural. We just wish we’d thought of it first.
What we make using Organic Cotton:
Merino Wool Base Layers; Men’s | Women’sMerino Wool Knitwear; Men’s | Women’sMerino Wool Underwear


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The map above shows how all the pieces come together to make our Merino wool base layers.


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The map above shows how all the pieces come together to make our Merino wool knitwear.

Merino Wool

This is the Merino sheep. His wool makes just about the best active clothing you can buy. Way, way more effective than man-made synthetics like polyester. Which is why everyone at howies swears by wearing Merino during sport.

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Organic Cotton
Cotton is one of the most heavily sprayed crops grown by man, with a myriad of insecticides used on it during the growing process. And you can bet the shirt on your back that those nasty insecticides stay on that cotton for the whole time you wear it too. Common sense says that can’t be doing you any good.
That’s why, wherever possible, we use organic cotton – cotton grown without any of the nasty stuff — so you needn’t worry about anything bad rubbing off on you.
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We’ve been using organic cotton in our clothing for over 10 years, since way back in 2002 when we converted to using 100% organic cotton in our T-shirts and haven’t looked back since.
From there the range grew to include organic denim jeans, organic cotton twill for trousers and shorts, as well as tops, sweatshirts, shirts.

What we make using Organic Cotton:
Organic Cotton T-Shirts; Men’s | Women’sOrganic Cotton Shirts; Men’s | Women’sOrganic Denim Jeans; Men’s | Women’sSweatshirts; Men’s | Women’s


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The map above shows how all the pieces come together to make our handprinted Organic Cotton T-Shirts.

Organic Cotton

Cotton is one of the most heavily sprayed crops grown by man, with a myriad of insecticides used on it during the growing process. And you can bet the shirt on your back that those nasty insecticides stay on that cotton for the whole time you wear it too. Common sense says that can’t be doing you any good.

That’s why, wherever possible, we use organic cotton – cotton grown without any of the nasty stuff — so you needn’t worry about anything bad rubbing off on you.

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Broken Twill
Popularized by rodeo riders back in the 1960s, broken twill is a style of weave famous for it’s unique zigzag pattern; invented to combat the twisting effect you can get with regular denim.
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If you’re a denim geek, you’ll know that traditionally a twill is woven either to the right hand or the left hand, which can cause tension in the fabric. It’s that tension which can make the outside seam of a regular jean twist around to the front or back, after it’s washed.
A broken twill weave contains no distinctive direction though. Instead, alternating right and left in an intentionally random zig-zag pattern. This texture gives the denim a more balanced construction and eliminates the twisted leg effect. It will also give your jeans a wonderfully irregular, streaky fade pattern as they age. And as a bonus, it also makes them softer than a traditional jean too.
Sounds pretty good to us. Then again, who are we to argue with a bunch of cowboys anyway?
What we make using broken twill
Broken Twill Jeans; Men’sBroken Twill Trousers; Men’s

Broken Twill

Popularized by rodeo riders back in the 1960s, broken twill is a style of weave famous for it’s unique zigzag pattern; invented to combat the twisting effect you can get with regular denim.

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Recycled Fabrics
Sometimes we use man-made fabrics in our clothes to make them the best that they can be.
Making great quality clothes means more to us than making something that just looks great or works well. That’s why we try to source recycled or recyclable man-made fabrics whenever possible to help lower our impact in production or create something that will last a little longer and can be turned into something new after it’s been loved.
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Fabrics like the recycled polyester that we use in our technical jackets is made from plastic bottles and post-consumer polyester that is processed and spun into a new fabric.
Recently we’ve even used recycled polyester in our jeans. Our Soda Pop jeans used a beautiful denim that combined recycled drinks bottles with conventional cotton to create a fabric that uses about 6 recycled bottles in every pair of jeans. For every plastic bottle that goes into a pair of jeans it’s one less in land fill and a little less cotton that needs to be farmed and grown. Using recycled polyester in our Soda Pop jeans lowered our CO2 emissions and water consumption in production too.
When it comes to man-made fabrics, we say out with the new, in with the old.
What we make using recycled fabrics
Jackets (Recycled Polyester); Men’s | Women’s

Recycled Fabrics

Sometimes we use man-made fabrics in our clothes to make them the best that they can be.

Making great quality clothes means more to us than making something that just looks great or works well. That’s why we try to source recycled or recyclable man-made fabrics whenever possible to help lower our impact in production or create something that will last a little longer and can be turned into something new after it’s been loved.

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Selvedge Denim
Make it once. Make it well. Make it last.
The key ingredients are quality and good design. To make something the best you can, from the best possible materials. To go the extra mile it takes to do that. Every stitch, every button, every little feature considered. The weakest points made strong. Then, and only then, have we made something that will stand the test of time.
You only have to look a little closer at our selvedge denim to understand what we mean.
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If you too are a denim geek, you will know that selvedge denim is made on old narrow-width shuttle looms. This produces a narrower roll of denim, making pattern cutting all that more important to ensure all of the fabric is used.
This old fashioned way of weaving denim means these looms are few and far between. It takes a little longer make to make the denim but produces a fabric which is tougher and has a feel that can’t be recreated by the new looms.
As a bonus, selvedge denim gets better and better with age. The old shuttle looms produce an irregularity to the weave and it’s those irregularities that become more visible as the jeans fade - making every pair develop its own unique pattern.
And to top it all we use selvedge that has been rope dyed with natural indigo dye, just like the original blue jean back in the 1850’s. The depth of colour you find in these jeans can only be achieved with the use of pure indigo.
Selvedge, though, is probably best known for its naturally woven white “self-edge” and the colour thread running through it.
Subtle, we know, but you won’t find many like these. Then again not every company are geeks like us.

The Golden Rules of Selvedge
These jeans are made from selvedge denim - a denim woven on old shuttle looms, they produce a fabric which is slightly irregular and gets better with age.
The trick is to wear your selvedge jeans for as long as you can - without washing them, in order to distress them yourself and give them their own character.
So follow these simple guidelines and you’ll have a pair of jeans with a unique history and story to tell.

1. Delay washing them for as long as possible.
2. Wear ’em and wear ’em, then wear ’em some more.
3. If they smell, try sticking them in the freezer.
4. Only wash them when the stink is unbearable.
5. Wash them cold and inside out. Drip dry only.
6. Turn the hem up to flash a bit of selvedge edge.
7. Avoid white sofas (you might leave a blue mark).

What we make using selvedge denim
Selvedge Jeans; Men’s

Selvedge Denim

Make it once. Make it well. Make it last.

The key ingredients are quality and good design. To make something the best you can, from the best possible materials. To go the extra mile it takes to do that. Every stitch, every button, every little feature considered. The weakest points made strong. Then, and only then, have we made something that will stand the test of time.

You only have to look a little closer at our selvedge denim to understand what we mean.

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